Exhibitions autumn 2022 | Fall Art Preview | Hudson Valley – 71Bait

Renowned painter Robert Bardo, sculptor Emil Alzmora and Richard Segalman are just a few of the talented artists exhibiting in the Hudson Valley this fall.

“Holograms: Dimensions in Light” at the Cornell Creative Arts Center

Until October 31st

click to enlarge

  • Materialization, a laser transmission hologram by Ikuo Nakamura from the Holograms: Dimensions in Light exhibit at the Cornell Creative Arts Center.

New York City’s HoloCenter, an organization dedicated to holographic arts, has temporarily relocated to the Cornell Creative Arts Center while relocating permanently to Kingston. “Holograms: Dimensions in Light” features work from the center’s 23-year history, including art from the pioneers of holographic media: Rudie Berkhout, Betsy Connors, Melissa Crenshaw, Jacques Desbiens, Eva Davidova, Matthew Gantt, Linda Law, Sam Moree , Martina Mrongovius, August Muth, Ikuo Nakamura, Ana Maria Nicholson, and Dan Schweitzer. These 3-D photographs possess a spectral quality seemingly linked to the spirit world via technology, and are unlike anything seen this season.

“Kurt Seligmann: Beyond the Everyday” at the Kurt Seligmann Center

October 14 – November 30

click to enlarge Amphitrite.jpg

Swiss-American surrealist artist Kurt Seligmann (1900-1962) was one of the first in the movement to emigrate from Europe to the United States in the 1930s. This exhibition presents the juxtaposition of the mysteries of the subconscious embedded in ordinary domestic life through the catalyzing backdrop of the Seligmann homestead in Sugar Loaf. Through the lens of the Seligmann homestead, these works, along with various ephemera, photographs, and other artifacts, demonstrate an understanding of the artist as represented through the trivialities of everyday life.

“Sowing the Seeds of the Void” at the Garrison Art Center

Until 6.11

click to enlarge A detail from I Am The Emptiness, an installation by Jayoung Yoon, part of the exhibition "Sowing seeds of emptiness" at the Garrison Art Center.

  • A detail from I Am The Emptiness, an installation by Jayoung Yoon, part of the Sowing the Seeds of the Emptiness exhibit at the Garrison Art Center.

Jayoung Yoon is a South Korean-born, New York-based artist whose primary medium is her own hair. Her work, which uses crisscrossed and woven lengths of hair to create semi-transparent sculptural forms and two-dimensional geometric imagery, draws on the mind-matter phenomenon and explores memory, perception, and bodily sensations. The delicate and tactile nature of the medium requires attention and presence at work, which can shift due to subtle changes in airflow.

“Robert Bordo” in the foreland

October 15 – November 27

click to enlarge The Look by Robert Bordo (oil on canvas over wood, 2016), part of a major exhibition of the artist's work at the Foreland.

  • The Look by Robert Bordo (oil on canvas over wood, 2016), part of a major exhibition of the artist’s work at the Foreland.

Bortolami Gallery is taking over Foreland’s largest gallery space in Catskill to showcase new and previous work by renowned painter Robert Bordo. The New York-based, Canadian-American artist is known for paintings that oscillate between representation and abstraction, combining modernist formal concerns with postmodern approaches to imagery, subject matter, and metaphor. Bordo’s ultimate subject may be painting itself, and his work a conversation between its various forms and functions.

“A Memorial to Ice Cream at the Dead Deer Disco” at the Thomas Cole Historic Site and Mass MoCA

Until November 27th at Thomas Cole and January 1st at Mass MoCA

Emanating from sculpture, Marc Swanson’s work is imbued with a sense of the macabre, camp, grief, foreboding, and a dark sense of humor. Sometimes of great scale and conceptual skill, his installations combine elements of diorama, set design, taxidermy and funerary aesthetics to reflect on the catastrophic effects of the climate crisis and its parallels with the AIDS crisis. The shrinking grandeur of nature reminds Swanson of the nightclub scene of his youth and with it the disappearance of spaces in which feelings of belonging and unbridled, wild self-expression are possible.

Man Saves Shark at the Garage Gallery

8th to 30th October

click to enlarge Model for Man Saves Shark by Emil Alzamora at the Garage Gallery.

  • Model for Man Saves Shark by Emil Alzamora at the Garage Gallery.

Beacon-based sculptor Emil Alzamora has gained international acclaim for his work exploring the limits and meaning of the human form. His sculptures of the human form are beautiful grotesques that reveal hidden meanings in their distortion. Man Saves Shark is Alzamora’s first foray into the interface between the human and animal kingdoms – and we’re here for it. He made sharks cuddly. The centerpiece of the Beacons Garage Gallery exhibition, Man Saves Shark, is a depiction of two beings as sensual as Rodin’s The Kiss.

“A spell is a map of what is meant for you” at Fridman Gallery

Until October 30th

click to enlarge At Work by Alisa Sikelianos-Carter, part of the exhibition A Spell is a Map to What is Meant for You at Fridman Gallery.  - Photo by Alon Koppel Photography

  • At Work by Alisa Sikelianos-Carter, part of the exhibition A Spell is a Map to What is Meant for You at Fridman Gallery. Photo by Alon Koppel Photography

Alisa Sikelianos-Carter’s mixed media works on paper explore connections between black ancestry, power, intuition and the divine at Fridman Gallery in Beacon. Her work deals closely with textures – hard ground, velvety gouache, glittering mica and other luminous materials – and maps the diversity of the color black and the black experience. Sikelianos-Carter creates devotional items that assert that black facial features are a manifestation of a sacred and divine technology that has served as a means of survival, both physical and metaphysical.

“Richard Segalman: Contemporary American Impressionist” at WAAM

October 14 – December 31

click to enlarge E292 Scarlet Ribbon by Richard Segalman, oil on canvas 42×60 c.2019

  • E292 Scarlet Ribbon by Richard Segalman, oil on canvas 42×60 c.2019

Richard Segalman (1934-2021) is best known for his light-filled, large-scale paintings of women on the beach in voluminous dresses, demonstrating a masterful painterly technique. Curated by WAAM Managing Director Nicole Goldberg, this retrospective spans Segalman’s career spanning six decades and features 24 artworks including oil paintings, watercolors, pastels, drawings and monotypes. The works come from regional collectors, the artist’s estate and the permanent collection of WAAM.

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